Troys Twitter Script

Twitter magic logo

I recently wrote a post that recommended a few userscripts to boost your Twitter homepage. A week ago, a new script came out that embeds a few scripts into one.

Troys Twitter Script will make your Twitter homepage look like it’s shooting up steroids straight through its veins. Here is the list of additional features you will get on the homepage:

Nested Replies, @Mentions, Custom Search Tabs, Autocomplete, Pagination, RT button, Media Embed, URL Expansion, Hash Tag Search Links, Social Links

This app is really neat as it ‘unzips’ all the media, links and conversations that usually don’t appear on your homepage. I recommend trying it. Unfortunately, it makes my screengrab bug so I can’t show you a sneak preview ­čÖü

Enhance Your Twitter Productivity With Those Scripts

Twitter is a new way to communicate, and that’s what makes it cool. However, the development team makes it hard for non-techies to understand how to use the service, simply because most of the truly needed features are not directly built in the UI. I don’t like Twitter apps either because they’re all annoying (I’m looking at you, Thwirl), and they require a lot of attention. So unproductive from my standpoint. I have other fishes to fry (or other cats to whip as we say so elegantly in French).

Thankfully, Greasemonkey is here to save the day! Below is a screenshot of my dashboard on twitter.com. As you can see, there are a few additions that make everything much more interactive.

Have a look at this screenshot, and find all the related scripts below this pic.

twitter scripts

The big square where I can easily shorten an url, upload a pick, or submit a video is built by Twixxer. It took me a while to start using it, but now I am totally addicted to its ease of use.

In the sidebar, the mentions are the tweets that contain your name, but not at the beginning of the tweet (and therefore not considered as a reply). Script here.

A little more below, I can also see the 10 most popular trends on Twitter. Most of the time, I don’t pay attention to those. Sometimes, a funny one (like #farted today) will catch my attention, and it’s mostly a way to be aware of the actual buzz. Script here.

Farther below in the sidebar are all the latest replies directed to the profile’s holder. Here, I am on my profile, so it’s not really useful. But when visiting other people’s profile, it helps to see how conversational they are on Twitter, and what kind of replies they get. The script is useful but half-reliable (it won’t show all replies, and will sometimes show tweets that are not replies). Script here.

On each profile pictures, you can see a cycling arrow. When this arrow shows, it means this user is following me. On Twitter, I like reciprocity. I regularly go on friendorfollow to get rid of those guys who wait for a follow-back to un-follow you. But it takes time to clean up your friends’ list, so this tool is kind of a shortcut. Script here.

There is one script that is sometimes useful but that doesn’t show here because it is often broken (Twitter doesn’t seem to like this script): the ‘retweet this’ button. The button sits right below the reply button, and it makes it easier for re-tweeting an item, compared to the traditional copying the text, hitting reply, pasting the text, and adding RT before the name of the original twitterer. Script here.

There are a whole lot more scripts for twitter.com out there, but those ones are the most useful to my opinion, and as of today, February 10th, they all work properly. If you have some cool ones too, please do share!

Followback icon for your Twitter homepage

Twitter magic logo

There are two sites I go to when I have time to kill:

  • Userscripts: find new Greasemonkey scripts to optimize my social media life.
  • Friendorfollow: the service that tells you who is it that you follow but that doesn’t follow you back on Twitter.

Well I just found a nice little script that will decrease my regular visits to friendorfollow, the Twitter Show Followers:

Places a small icon over the pictures of people who follow you back on your Twitter home page.

That simple. And it works. The icon is not obtrusive. Again, it is a nice little addition that Twitter should consider integrating to make their service easier to understand for new users.

View Anybody’s @ Replies In Their Profile’s Sidebar

twitter greasemonkey

twitter sidebar

A nice little script just popped up in the Greasemonkey repertory: The Twitter Sidebar Replies. As you can see on the screenshot here, it shows you all the replies that were directed to the user of the page you are on.

As you can imagine, this tool is handy when you want to see the social activity of a Twitterer, and maybe intricate yourself into his discussions.

I was using another script – the Nested Twitter Replies – to figure out directly from twitter.com who was talking to who. The problem is that the script is accurate 60% of the time. Some people hit the reply button just to save time writing the name of a person, but don’t actually intend to reply to a previous tweet. Others write the @ directly, making it impossible for a computer to discriminate a real reply. The script wasn’t adding much value to my twitterings.

If you are interested in trying out a few scripts for twitter.com, here is a short list to get you started: Endless Tweets – Loads older tweets endlessly when you’re scrolling on the Twitter timeline (may conflict with other scripts).

Nested twitter Replies – Adds nested replies to every Twitter conversation thread (the script I was mentioning above).

Twitter Enhancement: Re-Tweet This to plurk – Append a retweet button to the end of each twitter entry for the purpose to retwee this entry to Plurk (I don’t really use Plurk, so i can’t judge the efficiency).

Google Reader + Twitter – Adds reader posts to twitter when clicked.

Twitter Sidebar Replies – Shows replies to a user is the sidebar of that user’s Twitter page (the topic of this article).

Twitter Tips: Show Replies To A User In The Sidebar

twitter greasemonkey

twitter sidebar replies

A nice little script just popped up in the Greasemonkey repertory: The Twitter Sidebar Replies. As you can see on the screenshot here, it shows you all the replies that were directed to the user of the page you are on. As you can imagine, this tool is handy when you want to see the social activity of a Twitter user, and maybe intricate yourself into his discussions.

I was using another script – the Nested Twitter Replies – to figure out directly from twitter.com who was talking to who. The problem is that the script is accurate 60% of the time. Some people hit the reply button just to save time writing the name of a person, but don’t actually intend to reply to a previous tweet. Others write the @ directly, making it impossible for a computer to discriminate a real reply. The script wasn’t adding much value to my twitterings.

If you are interested in trying out a few scripts for twitter.com, here is a short list to get you started:

  • Endless Tweets – Loads older tweets endlessly when you’re scrolling on the Twitter timeline (may conflict with other scripts).
  • Nested twitter Replies – Adds nested replies to every Twitter conversation thread (the script I was mentioning above).
  • Twitter Enhancement: Re-Tweet This to plurk – Append a retweet button to the end of each twitter entry for the purpose to retwee this entry to Plurk (I don’t really use Plurk, so i can’t judge the efficiency).
  • Google Reader + Twitter – Adds reader posts to twitter when clicked.
  • Twitter Sidebar Replies – Shows replies to a user is the sidebar of that user’s Twitter page (the topic of this article).